!!> Reading ➷ The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars: A Neuropsychologist's Odyssey Through Consciousness ➯ Author Paul Broks – Terrapin-info.co.uk

The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars: A Neuropsychologist's Odyssey Through Consciousness A Beautifully Written Investigation Of Grief As An Exploration Of Love And Loss, As A Portrait Of A Person And Of The Nature Of Personhood, This Book Is About As True As Any I Have Read James McConnachie, Sunday TimesAn Audacious And Beautiful Account Of Grief And Who We Are Memoir, Neuroscience And Myth Interweave To Create A Book Unlike Any OtherWhen Celebrated Neuropsychologist Paul Broks Wife Died Of Cancer, He Found Himself Plunged Into The World Of The Bereaved As He Experienced The Pain, Alienation And Suffering That Make Us Human, His Clinician Self Seemed To Watch On With Keen Interest He Embarked Upon A Voyage Of Experience A Journey Through Grief, Philosophy, Consciousness, Humanity And Magical Thinking Seen Through The Prism Of A Lifetime S Work In Neuroscience Fusing An Account Of Living With And Recovering From Loss With Thought Provoking Meditations On The Nature Of The Mind And The Self, The Darker The Night, The Brighter The Stars Is An Audacious And Beautiful Work By A Writer Of Astonishing Wisdom And Compassion.

  • Paperback
  • The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars: A Neuropsychologist's Odyssey Through Consciousness
  • Paul Broks
  • 22 October 2017
  • 9780241957462

About the Author: Paul Broks

Paul Broks is an English neuropsychologist and science writer He is a former Prospect columnist, and his work has been featured in The Times, Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, and Granta Trained as a clinical psychologist at Oxford University, Broks is a specialist in clinical neuropsychology and is the author of Into the Silent Land, which was shortlisted for The Guardian s First Book Award.



10 thoughts on “The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars: A Neuropsychologist's Odyssey Through Consciousness

  1. says:

    The deeper I got into this book, the I skimmed Nothing Paul Broks was saying was sticking in my mind Nothing He appeared to be searching for meaning I think but all I felt was meaninglessness while reading Three stars for a ne...

  2. says:

    I got a review copy of this from First To Read The description First line Paul Broks weaves together imaginative stories of everything from artificial intelligence to the Greek philosophers in order to sketch a beautiful, inimitable view of humanness that is as heartbreaking at it is affirming grabbed me, so I requested a copy The rest of the description follows When celebrated neuropsychologist Paul Broks s wife died of cancer, it sparked a journey of grief and reflection I had never heard of Broks so his celebrity might be localized I am also not all that acquainted with neuropsychology, and had to do a little background research unnecessary for reading this to familiarize myself.Broks writes in his prologueThis is not a conventional book and I think you should know what you re in for He s right It s not Continuing What I hope you are about to read is a mix of memoir, neurological case stories, and reflections on life, death and the mind.In short and long passages, he does all that and .Broks shares his grief following his wife s death in PART ONE A GRIEF OBSERVED, meandering through nonlinear memories, fantasy and myth, and talking points of his trade He mentions Julian Jaynes, whose Origin of Consciousness is on my to read list, nudging the book up a notch or two c...

  3. says:

    I absolutely loved this book I loved the mix of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir It created the kind of edge in words that we live on every day in our minds Broks perfectly captures the winding labyrinth of the mind and its thoughts, dreams, fantasies I really enjoyed being able to return to this book each day to read a little and ponder on the questions Broks posits I think, too, that it helps that many of these questions are ones that I struggle with too Maybe that is because there are no answers Still Broks grapples with grief, loss, philosophy, quantum mechanics, psychology, and so much So many of the lines in this book are quote worthy His writing reminds me a lot of Oliver Sacks, but Broks has his own u...

  4. says:

    I didn t enjoy this book as much as I expected to but it s still a very good one, aside from some hiccups.Broks is at his best in the autobiographic chapters, passages and moments, writing starkly, honestly, and bittersweet ly The rest of the book is given over, mostly, to neurological philosophical ruminations on consciousness, and Greek mythology Both have a reason for being in the book Broks career as a neuropsychologist aside but for me, they often went on for too long in the same train, the Greek mythology particularly Perhaps erudite readers will be able to see various connections between all the Greek stories recounted and facets of Broks life, or of human consciousness, but I certainly didn t spot them The author clearly finds them very interesting, harking as they do from a time and a culture that he attributes as the definitive direction setter for mankind s intellectual progress since, but honestly, I wanted to read about people with fascinating brain disorders, not bulls copulating with women and Zeus spreading his seed everywhere.There s some very weird moments too the author explains at the beginning that some parts of the book are fictional or semi fictional, but I didn t understand and didn t enjo...

  5. says:

    Does life have meaning if we die The Being of the now that leads to consciousness is it the hard problem Is there a self over time, does the question even make sense or is the ship of Theseus not a paradox Is my partner a Zombie with 15% probability as the author implies with a vignette All of these kinds of questions are standard neuroscience ponderings, but they are told with finesse and nuance within this story and are always highly entertaining and at times laugh out loud funny.The author starts the book with a quote from Albert Einstein on how a friend dying before Einstein really doesn t matter because time is just an illusion and all that has happened and all that will happen has already happened within the block universe you do believe in cause and effect Or do you lean with Heraclites and we never cross the same river and all is becoming not being Time is an illusion but it does not mean that consciousness is an illusion, as the author will say that for something to be an illusion it must be within the consciousness and if there is not consciousness there could be no illusion Delusions are different, the author will say, a delusion is to know with certainty something about reality to be true but is not true Certainty is the enemy of growth and stifles the discovery of meaning.The author suggests that the origins of a thought that led to the awareness of the self ...

  6. says:

    A really innovative book about the nature of consciousness Rather than just try to answer the question of consciousness directly, Broks uses illustrations from different sources to touch on the answer from many angles It is at one time both biological, cultural, personal and individual It is one thing to experience it, and another to describe it or define it It could be described differently at different times and places and life stages It is the subject of philosophical discourse.Broks is, by profession, a neuroscientist He is therefore able to tell us something of the biology of consciousness with illustrations relating his work and to some of his patients Since his wife died he has considered the religious and philosophical nature of consciousness, the way it changes from conception to adulthood and whether, and in what ways, it might persist...

  7. says:

    Read on Audible A very personal account of the meanings of consciousness, this book interleaves Paul Brooks experiences relating to the death of his wife to his neuroscientific work, psychological and philosophical approaches to consciousness It is very well written and thought provoking It s or less an action research case study approach, so not specifically mainstream scientific This makes it into an enjoyable and not a daunting read I think it s worth a second, careful...

  8. says:

    I got to read this book before its publication date due to the First to Read program hosted by Penguin Random House which gives readers digital galleys to read and review I just want to preface this review by saying it s very rare for me to not finish a book Unfortunately, The Darker the Night, The Brighter the Stars by Paul Broks was one of those rare books One has to be impressed by how daunting of a task Broks took on when deciding to write a book focusing on the human consciousness, however, being an individual with very little knowledge on the theories of human consciousness, I frequently got lost in what felt like endless rambling The book frequently shifts topic, even during the duration of a short chapter, oscillating from topics such as cancer to Greek mythology to neuropsychologist friends of Broks, making the thoughts remarkably hard to follow and lea...

  9. says:

    The idea of weaving mythology, fiction, nonfiction and clinical study notes is an intriguing one, especially when it comes to the mind and consciousness, but I failed to grasp the message Brok was trying to portray which made it difficult to read The shifts from one topic to another or one theory to another did not transition well like rambling multiple topics with no direct purpose I kept thinking that I was going to learn , feel , or ponder something deep and moving but in the end, it all fell flat to me I think this book is a good example of the saying, jack of all trades but the master of none When viewed as a memoir, the stale clinical points takes away the emotion When viewed scientifically, the mythology gets lost Each point was decently done, but the overall meaning was missed at least, to me anyway I did not feel entertained, enlightened, educated, or moved. I simply felt nothing when I finished this book There were times where I was intrigued and wanted to know ...

  10. says:

    Loss and grief is an individual process It is unique to every person and to every situation The Darker the Night, The Brighter the Stars A Neuropsychologist s Odyssey Through Consciousness is Paul Borks journey not a literal description of the life aspects of that journey but ra...

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